Rights of victims of crime in criminal proceedings - Greece

You will be considered a victim of crime if you have suffered damage, e.g. you have been injured or your property has been damaged or stolen, as a result of an incident which constitutes an offence under Greek law. As a victim of crime, the law grants you certain individual rights before, during and after the trial.

Criminal proceedings in Greece start with the investigation (dierévnisi) of the crime. Sometimes the investigation is divided into a preliminary investigation (prokatarktikí exétasi) and a judicial investigation (anákrisi). The aim of a preliminary investigation is to explore the circumstances of the case and establish whether criminal proceedings should be instituted or not.

The investigation is conducted by the police and by officers of the court — the public prosecutor (eisangeléas), the investigating judge (anakritís), or both. At the end of the investigation, the police officer in charge of the case forwards all the evidence collected to the prosecutor. The prosecutor then examines the work done so far and forwards the case to the court together with his or her recommendations for how the case should proceed further.

After reviewing the case file and the prosecutor’s recommendations, the court will either order a trial or close the case.

At the trial the court considers all the evidence collected and decides whether or not the defendant is guilty. If the defendant is found guilty, he or she is convicted and sentenced. If the defendant is found not guilty, he or she is acquitted.

For further information, please refer to the following links:

Link opens in new window1 - My rights as a victim of crime

Link opens in new window2 - Reporting a crime and my rights during the investigation or trial

Link opens in new window3 - My rights after trial

Link opens in new window4 - Compensation

Link opens in new window5 - My rights to support and assistance


The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Last update: 24/06/2019

1 - My rights as a victim of crime


What information will I be provided with by the authority (e.g. police, public prosecutor) after the crime occurred but before I even report the crime?

From your first contact with the police, or other competent authority, you will be given information, without undue delay and by any means available, on the terms and conditions of admissibility of a criminal complaint, and on the right to join the civil proceedings as a civil party seeking damages (politikós enágon); on how and under what conditions you can obtain legal assistance, lodge a claim for damages , or obtain translation and interpretation services; on the restorative justice available, and the authorities that can work towards restoring the damage by mediating between you and the offender; on how and under what conditions expenses incurred as a result of your participation in the criminal proceedings can be reimbursed; and how you can make a complaint against an authority if you feel your rights have not been respected.

In addition to your rights in the criminal proceedings, you will also be informed

about access to medical care, and any specialist support, including psychological assistance and alternative accommodation, and about how and under what conditions protective measures may be applied.

If you reside in another EU Member State, you will be given specific information on how and under what conditions you can exercise your rights.

The scope and content of the information given will vary depending on your particular requirements and personal situation and the type and nature of the offence. In the course of the proceedings additional and more thorough information will be supplied, at the competent authority’s discretion, depending on your needs (Article 57 of Law 4478/2017, on the right to receive information from the first contact with a competent authority (Article 4 of Directive 2012/29/EU)).

I don’t live in the EU country where the crime took place (EU and non-EU citizens). How are my rights protected?

If you reside in an EU Member State other than the state where the crime was committed, you will be called to make a statement immediately after you report the offence. This can be done in accordance with the provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure (Kódikas Poinikís Dikonomías — ‘KPD’) allowing for the use of communications technology, e.g. videoconferencing, telephone or Internet (Article 233(1) KPD).

If you reside in Greece and the offence was committed in another EU Member State, you may lodge a criminal complaint with the public prosecutor at the magistrates’ court (eisangeléas plimmeleiodikón) of your place of residence, who will forward your complaint to the competent law enforcement authority of the relevant Member State without undue delay, through the public prosecutor at the court of appeal (eisangeléas efetón), unless the Greek courts have jurisdiction in the matter. The prosecutor is under no obligation to forward your complaint to the Member State where the criminal offence was committed if Greek law is applicable and criminal proceedings are brought in Greece. In that case, in order to ensure that you receive adequate information and to promote mutual legal assistance, the prosecutor at the magistrates’ court that handles the case will so notify the competent law enforcement authority in the Member State where the criminal offence was committed, without undue delay, through the prosecutor at the court of appeal.

(Article 64 of Law 4478/2017, on the rights of victims resident in another Member State (Article 17 of Directive 2012/29/EU))

If I report a crime, what information will I receive?

When you lodge a criminal complaint, the responsible officer must inform you that you can obtain a copy of your complaint.

(Article 58 of Law 4478/2017, on the right of victims when making a complaint (Article 5 of Directive 2012/29/EU))

When a criminal complaint is lodged it is given a unique complaint registration number (arithmós vivlíou mínysis). That number allows you to monitor the course of your case using the register kept at the prosecutor’s office or by contacting the complaints office responsible. You may also request and obtain a case progress certificate (pistopoiitikó poreías) indicating the current stage of the proceedings (e.g. an investigation is being carried out to establish the validity of the complaint, or a preliminary investigation is being conducted) and describing the outcome at each stage (e.g. the prosecutor has discontinued proceedings; criminal charges have been brought and the offender has been committed for trial, in which case you will be told the time and place of the trial and the nature of the charges brought; a pre‑trial judicial inquiry (kyría anákrisi) is in progress, or an order has been made dismissing the charges or terminating the prosecution; a court judgment has been given, if you have joined the criminal proceedings as a civil party seeking damages).

(Article 59 of Law 4478, on the right of victims to receive information about their case (Article 6 of Directive 2012/29/EU))

If your case falls under the jurisdiction of the Athens Court of First Instance (Protodikeío Athinón), when it reaches court your lawyer can monitor its progress on the website of the Athens Bar Association (Dikigorikós Sýllogos AthinónLink opens in new windowhttp://www.dsa.gr/). This option is not available to victims themselves, as the use of credentials is required.

Am I entitled to free interpreting or translation services (when I contact the police or other authorities, or during investigation and trial)?

If you do not understand or speak Greek, you can lodge a criminal complaint in a language you do understand, or be given the necessary linguistic assistance, always subject to the terms and conditions laid down in the Code of Criminal Procedure or any specific criminal laws — you will be informed accordingly by the responsible officers. You may request a translation of your complaint free of charge.

(Article 58 of Law 4478, on the right of victims when making a complaint (Article 5 of Directive 2012/29/EU))

If you are to be examined as a witness at any stage of the proceedings and you are unable to speak or understand Greek sufficiently well, you will be given the services of an interpreter without delay. The right to interpreting services includes the provision of proper assistance to persons with hearing or speech impediments. Where appropriate, communication technology such as videoconferencing, telephone or the Internet may be used, unless the physical presence of the interpreter is considered imperative by the person examining you (Article 233(1) KPD).

How does the authority ensure that I understand and that I am understood (if I am a child; if I have a disability)

At their first contact with you, the police or other authorities will communicate with you in simple and accessible language, either orally or in writing, taking account of your personal characteristics, such as, primarily, your age, maturity level, intellectual and mental abilities, education, language skills, any hearing or speech impediments, or whether you are in severe emotional distress which affects your ability to understand or to be understood. A guide to your rights is available written in the most commonly spoken languages and in Braille (Article 56(2) of Law 4478/2017 (Article 3 of Directive 2012/29/EU)). Moreover, if you have a hearing or speech impediment, you will be provided with proper assistance by an interpreter (Article 233(1) KPD).

I am a minor – do I have special rights?

If you are a minor (under the age of 18), your legal representative (parent or guardian) can report the offence on your behalf. If you are over 12 years old, you can report the offence together with your legal representative (Article 118(2) of the Criminal Code (Poinikós Kódikas — ‘PK’)).

Whether you have special rights during the criminal proceedings depends on the nature of the offence. For instance, if you are a victim of an infringement of your personal or sexual freedom, human trafficking, sex tourism, abduction, kidnapping or a sex crime, you have a right to:

  • consult your case file, even if you have not joined the criminal proceedings as a civil party (Article 108A KPD);
  • have your interview recorded so that it can be used during the further criminal proceedings and you do not need to appear again before the prosecutor or the court (Article 226A KPD);
  • obtain the assistance of a psychologist or child psychiatrist when you are examined as a witness;
  • obtain information on whether the offender has been released (Article 108A KPD);
  • request a restraining order against the offender prohibiting him or her from contacting you or going near your home.
  • Moreover, you are in any case entitled to:
  • an individual assessment, in order to establish whether special protection measures should be applied where there is a risk of repeat victimisation (Article 68 of Law 4478/2017, on the individual assessment of victims to identify specific protection needs (Article 22 of Directive 2012/29/EU));
  • request the prosecution or judicial authorities to appoint a legal guardian for minors (epimelitís anilikón) to represent you at any stage of the criminal proceedings, if your parents are unable to represent your or if you are unaccompanied or separated from your family (Article 69(7) of Law 4478/2017, on the right to protection of victims with specific protection needs during criminal proceedings (Articles 23 and 24 of Directive 2012/29/EU);
  • ask to join the proceedings as a civil party seeking damages, assisted by your legal representative (Article 82(2) KPD).

What information can I obtain from the police or from victim support organisations during the investigation of the crime?

You can obtain information about the current stage of the proceedings from the public prosecutor, if the case file (dikografía)has been sent to the prosecutor.

If you have joined the criminal proceedings as a civil party, you may consult the contents of the case file and be given copies of the documents in it once the accused has been called to provide a defence statement (apología), or an arrest warrant (éntalma sýllipsis) or a warrant for forced appearance (éntalma viaías prosagogís) has been issued (Article 108 KPD), or a suspect has been summoned by the authorities to provide explanations. Until then, the proceedings are confidential.

Victim support and protection services can provide information, advice and support on how you can exercise your rights, including the right to claim compensation for the damage you have sustained as a result of the offence, and your role in the criminal proceedings as a civil party or as a witness (Article 62 of Law 4478/2017, on support from victim support services (Article 9 of Directive 2012/29/EU)).

What are my rights as a witness?

If you are to be examined as a witness, you will be served a summons by the prosecutor or the police officer conducting preliminary inquiries, or by a district criminal court judge (ptaismatodíkis)or investigating judge (anakritís). You must appear and testify before them as soon as you receive the summons. You will be asked to describe what happened and, possibly, to answer some additional questions. If you are related to the suspect, you may refuse to testify (Article 222 KPD).

If you have a hearing or speech impediment, the examination may be conducted in writing. If you do not speak Greek, you have a right to the services of an interpreter free of charge.

If you are a victim of people trafficking you belong to a special group of witnesses: you will receive assistance beforehand from a psychologist or psychiatrist, acting in cooperation with the investigating police or judicial officers, who will use proper diagnostic methodologies to establish your intellectual capacity and psychological status. The psychologist or psychiatrist will be present during your examination. You may also be accompanied by your legal representative, unless the investigating judge makes an order preventing him or her from attending, giving reasons.

Your testimony will be written down and recorded audiovisually, where possible, so as to be submitted to the court electronically, in which case you need not be physically present at any subsequent stages of the proceedings.

If the case is one of domestic violence, and you are a member of the family, your testimony will not be taken on oath. If you are a minor, you will not be called to testify as a witness in court. Instead, you can provide a written statement which will be read in the courtroom, unless your physical presence is considered imperative.

Following your examination, you may seek reimbursement of any expenses you may have incurred (transport or accommodation expenses) from the authority that summoned you to testify (Article 288 KPD).

How can I get protection, if I am in danger?

Different types of protection are available, depending on the nature of the offence and your role in the criminal proceedings.

If you are a victim of organised crime or terrorism and have been summoned to testify as a key witness as part of a pre‑trial judicial investigation into criminal activities, you may seek special protection against potential retaliation or intimidation. Depending on the case, the type of protection available may include police protection, protection of your anonymity (your name, place of birth, home and work address, occupation, age etc. will be eliminated from all written records), or even a change of identity and relocation to another country. You may ask to testify by means of audiovisual technology. If you work for a public agency, you may also request a provisional or permanent transfer to another post. Protection measures will be subject to your consent, and will limit your freedom only to the extent necessary for your own safety; they may be suspended if you so request in writing or if you fail to cooperate to ensure their success (Article 9 of Law 2928/2001, on witness protection).

If you are a victim of domestic violence, the police officers handling your case may under no circumstances disclose your identity, the offender’s identity, your home address or any information that might reveal your identity (Article 20 of Law 3500/2006).

As a victim, you may apply in writing for measures to prevent any contact between you or your family members and the offender at the places where the criminal proceedings are conducted. Your application will be heard by the three-member magistrates’ court (trimelés plimmeleiodikeío) of the place of the criminal proceedings, at any stage in the proceedings, in accordance with the expedited procedure for offences in flagrante delicto

(Article 65 of Law 4478/2017, on the right to avoid contact between victim and offender (Article 19 of Directive 2012/29/EU)).


The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Last update: 24/06/2019

2 - Reporting a crime and my rights during the investigation or trial


How do I report a crime?

If you are a victim of crime, you can report the offence to the public prosecutor or to the police, by lodging a criminal complaint (énklisi or mínysi). (Strictly speaking, an énklisi is a criminal complaint made by the victim himself or herself. In certain situations criminal proceedings will be initiated only if there is such a complaint (e.g. in case of offences against a person’s honour and reputation). A mínysi is a criminal complaint or report made by a party other than the victim, in the case of an offence that the authorities can prosecute on their own initiative whether or not the victim complains. In practice, though, the term mínysi is used to refer to both types of complaint. Thus when a criminal complaint of whichever kind is lodged with the public prosecutor’s office, it is given a unique complaint register number known as an arithmós vivlíou minýseon — using the word minýsi).

You may also request another person to report the offence on your behalf. In this case, you must sign a written statement (dílosi or exousiodótisi), indicating the person that is to lodge the complaint for you. That statement does not come in a standardised form, but it must be signed before an officer of a central or local government authority or before a lawyer (including your own lawyer, if you already have one), who will authenticate your signature. The person reporting the offence on your behalf may be a lawyer or some other person you can trust. If the case is one where criminal proceedings require a criminal complaint by the victim, and the victim is dead, the right to lodge a complaint passes to his or her surviving spouse and children or to his or her parents (Article 118(4) of the Code of Criminal Procedure (Kódikas Poinikís Dikonomías — ‘KPD’). If the victim has died as a result of the offence these persons may also join the criminal proceedings in their own right as civil parties seeking damages for the pain and suffering caused to them.

You can report an offence either orally or in writing. If you choose to report an offence orally, the officer receiving your complaint will draw up a report recording it.

You need to pay a fee to lodge your complaint; the amount of the fee is periodically adjusted by a joint decision of the Minister for Finance and the Minister for Justice, Transparency and Human Rights. In exceptional situations, you will be allowed to pay the fee after you lodge the complaint, but in any event you must do so within three days. If you fail to pay the fee your complaint will be rejected as inadmissible. You are not required to pay the fee if you are entitled to legal aid. Nor are you required to pay the fee if you are a victim of an offence against sexual freedom or of financial exploitation of sexual life, domestic violence or racist discrimination (Articles 81A and 361B of the Criminal Code (Poinikós Kódikas — ‘PK’) or if there has been a breach of equal treatment (Article 46(2) KPD).

In the case of offences that can be prosecuted on the initiative of the authorities whether or not the victim has so requested, there are no time limits on reporting an offence, except that offences of intermediate gravity (plimmelímata) are time-barred after five years. In certain cases, however, the offence can be prosecuted only if you the victim, who have been harmed by it, ask for criminal proceedings to be brought. In these situations, you need to file a criminal complaint (énklisi) within three months of the date on which you became aware of the offence and the identity of the offender (if you know who the offender is).

There is no standard form you can use to lodge a complaint.

Your complaint must include the following information:

  • your full identification details;
  • the offender and his or her contact details, if you know them;
  • a thorough description of the facts;
  • any available documentary evidence substantiating your complaint;
  • any witnesses you suggest could be examined;
  • the details of your lawyer, if you have appointed one.

If you do not understand or speak Greek, you can lodge a criminal complaint in a language you do understand, or be given the necessary linguistic assistance, always subject to the terms and conditions laid down in the Code of Criminal Procedure or any other specific criminal laws. You may request a translation of the document free of charge (Article 58 of Law 4478/2017, on the rights of victims when making a complaint (Article 5 of Directive 2012/29/EU)).

How do I find out what’s happening with the case?

When a criminal complaint is lodged it is given a unique complaint registration number. That number allows you to monitor the progress of the case using the register kept at the prosecutor’s office or the responsible complaints office. You may also request and obtain a case progress certificate (pistopoiitikó poreías) indicating the current stage of the proceedings.

If your case falls under the jurisdiction of the Athens Court of First Instance (Protodikeío Athinón), when it reaches court your lawyer can monitor its progress on the website of the Athens Bar Association (Dikigorikós Sýllogos AthinónLink opens in new windowhttp://www.dsa.gr/). This option is not available to victims themselves, as the use of credentials is required.

Am I entitled to legal aid (during the investigation or trial)? Under what conditions?

During the trial you can have a lawyer, but you need to pay for his or her services.

If your annual family income is lower than two thirds of the annual minimum personal income defined in the National General Collective Labour Agreement, you will be provided with a lawyer free of charge, who will prepare and lodge a criminal complaint and represent you as a civil party at any stage of the proceedings, provided you are a victim of one of the following: torture or another offence against human dignity (Article 137(A) and (B) of the Criminal Code); discrimination or unequal treatment, an offence against life, personal freedom or sexual freedom; financial exploitation of sexual life; an offence against property or property rights; personal injury; or an offence related to marriage or the family. The offence must be a serious crime (kakoúrgima) or an intermediate offence (plimmélima) within the jurisdiction of the three-member magistrates’ court (trimeloús plimmeleiodikeío) that carries a minimum sentence of six months’ imprisonment (Law 3226/2004 (Government Gazette 24/Α/ 4/4.2.2004), as amended and supplemented by Law 4274/2014.) The person who assesses your request for legal aid in a criminal case is the presiding judge at the court where the case is pending or before which an appeal is to be brought.

The lawyer who acts for you will help you prepare and submit the documentation required to allow you to join the proceedings as a civil party and will assist you throughout the course of the proceedings.

Can I appeal if my case is closed before going to court?

If the prosecutor at the magistrates’ court (eisangeléas plimmeleiodikón) makes an order rejecting your complaint as without foundation in law, or obviously unfounded on the merits, or incapable of being assessed by a court, you may challenge the order before the responsible prosecutor at the court of appeal (eisangeléas efetón) (Articles 47 and 48 KPD) within three months of the date of the order — this time‑limit cannot be extended for any reason. To challenge the order you will have to pay a fee, which will be refunded if the prosecutor sustains it.

Can I be involved in the trial?

You can participate in the trial only if you are a civil party (politikó enágon) asking the court to award you damages for loss or for moral harm or pain and suffering. You can ask to join the criminal proceedings as a civil party by applying to the responsible public prosecutor, either in your criminal complaint or in a separate document, by the end of the pre-trial investigation (Article 308 KPD), either personally or through a lawyer holding general or specific authorisation to that effect. Your civil claim is recorded in a report with the lawyer’s authorisation attached (Article 83 KPD). If you have not asked to be treated as a civil party in your criminal complaint, you can still do so in the criminal court (Article 82 KPD) before the court starts to evaluate the evidence.

Your application to join the proceedings as a civil party will be rejected as inadmissible unless it includes a brief description of the case, the grounds of your claim and, if you are not a permanent resident within the territorial jurisdiction of the court, the appointment of an agent within that jurisdiction. The agent will be entitled to accept service of all documents or notices addressed to you as a civil party (Article 84 KPD). To be heard as a civil party in the criminal court you must appoint an authorised lawyer and pay a flat-rate fee in favour of the State, which covers the entire proceedings until there is a judgment that is no longer open to appeal. The amount of the fee is periodically adjusted by a joint decision of the Minister for Economic Affairs and Finance and the Minister for Justice.

As a civil party, you are a party to the proceedings, with a number of rights. You can attend all court hearings, including hearings in camera, and you have access to all the documents in the case. You are allowed to speak before the court to present your claims and you can also comment after a witness has been examined or make submissions or provide explanations on any testimony given or evidence presented (Article 358 KPD). You may put questions, through your lawyer, to the offender, the witnesses and the other participants (e.g. any technical experts appointed in the case). You will be asked to testify as a witness (though not on oath), and you can also propose witnesses, provided that the court is notified in good time. You are entitled to request an adjournment of the hearing or the replacement of a judge.

In any event , as a victim, you may be summoned by the court as a witness. In that case you are obliged to appear in court. When you are examined as a witness, you will have the opportunity to explain to the court the facts pertaining to the offence. The judge may also ask you some additional questions.

What is my official role in the justice system? For example, am I or can I choose to be a: victim, witness, civil party or private prosecutor?
What are my rights and obligations in this role?

You may choose whether to join the criminal proceedings as a civil party, which makes you a party to the entire proceedings, with substantial procedural rights, or simply to testify as a material witness, given that the criminal proceedings are taking place in particular as a result of the offence committed against you. The concept of a private prosecution does not exist in the Greek judicial system.

Can I make a statement during the trial or give evidence? Under what conditions?

You can submit documents, which will be read in court (Article 364 KPD) and will be included in the case file, and you can also call witnesses and notify the court accordingly (Article 326(2-1) KPD).

What information will I receive during the trial?

You may attend public hearings throughout the proceedings, the taking of evidence, the defendant’s statement of defence, the pleadings of the lawyers and the court’s judgment.

Will I be able to access court files?

As a civil party you have access to the contents of the case file and can obtain copies of the court’s judgment.


The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Last update: 24/06/2019

3 - My rights after trial


Can I appeal against the ruling?

At the end of the trial, the court will convict or acquit the defendant depending on the evidence presented. If the court finds the defendant not guilty, it clears him or her of the accusation, and if you have joined the proceedings as a civil party (politikós enágon) it will not rule on your claim for reparation or financial compensation for moral harm or pain and suffering. In such a case, the defendant is entitled to counterclaim against you seeking compensation and any expenses he or she has incurred in relation to the case (Article 71 of the Code of Criminal Procedure (Kódikas Poinikís Dikonomías — ‘KPD’). If the court finds the defendant guilty, it will sentence him or her, and will rule on the amount of compensation you are to receive from the defendant on the basis of your civil claim.

If the court acquits the defendant, you can appeal against the judgment only if you have been ordered to pay the defendant compensation and expenses, and only in that respect, under Article 486(1)(b) KPD. In addition, if you are a civil party, you can appeal against a part of the judgment that dismissed your claim as unfounded in law or a part that awarded you financial satisfaction or compensation (Article 488 KPD).

Alternatively, you can ask the public prosecutor to appeal against the judgment.

What are my rights after sentencing?

Once the court sentence enters into force, your role in the criminal proceedings is generally over. Greek legislation does not give crime victims any further rights at the stage when the sentence is being enforced. There is only one exception: if you are a minor who is a victim of an offence against personal and sexual freedom, you have all the associated rights, even if you have not joined the proceedings as a civil party, including the right to be informed by the public prosecutor if the offender is released, provisionally or permanently, and any leave granted to him or her when in prison (Article 108A KPD).

Am I entitled to support or protection after the trial? For how long?

As a victim, you are entitled to free and confidential general or specialist support and care services, depending on your needs, before, during and for a reasonable period of time after termination of the criminal proceedings. These rights may also extend to your family members, depending on their needs and on the severity of damage they have sustained as a result of the criminal offence that was committed against you. The police, or any other competent authority receiving your complaint, may provide you with information at your request, or refer you to: the social services of first- and second-level local government authorities; mental health facilities; Community Centres (Kéntra Koinótitas), the advice centres (symvoulevtiká kéntra) of the General Secretariat for Gender Equality; the support structures of the National Centre for Social Solidarity (Ethnikó Kéntro Koinonikís Allilengýis); the Independent Offices for the Protection of Underage Victims (Avtotelí Grafeía Prostasías Anílikon Thymáton) of the Ministry of Justice, Transparency and Human Rights; or private bodies and professional and volunteer associations. If you are a woman who is a victim of a crime against your personal or sexual freedom, or of financial exploitation of sexual life, domestic violence, human trafficking, procuring or racist crimes, your children are also entitled to receive support and care services (Article 61 of Law 4478/2017, on the right to access victim support and care services (Article 8 of Directive 2012/29/EU)).

General support and care services can provide you, among other things, with information and advice regarding your rights as a victim and your entitlement to claim compensation for criminal injuries; information on how you can take part in the criminal proceedings either as a civil party or as a witness; information about or direct referral to any relevant specialist support services in place; emotional and psychological support; advice relating to financial and practical issues arising from the crime; or advice relating to the prevention of secondary and repeat victimisation, intimidation and retaliation.

Specialist support and care services will refer victims to shelters or provide other appropriate temporary accommodation for victims in need of a safe place owing to an imminent risk of secondary or repeat victimisation, intimidation or retaliation, and can provide integrated support, including trauma support and counselling, for victims with specific needs, such as victims of racist or sexual violence, victims of identity- or gender-based violence, and victims of violence in close relationships (Article 62 of Law 4478/2017, on support from victim support services (Article 9 of Directive 2012/29/EU)).

What information will I be given if the offender is sentenced?

As a victim, you will be briefed on the progress of the criminal proceedings and notified of the court ruling without undue delay, if you so request, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure, provided that you have joined the criminal proceedings as a civil party. If you have joined the criminal proceedings as a civil party, you may be provided with information about the proceedings by email, in person or through your lawyer (Article 59 of Law 4478/2017, on the right of victims to receive information about their case (Article 6 of Directive 2012/29/EU))

Will I be told if the offender is released (including early or conditional release) or escapes from prison?

You have a right to be informed if a temporary detention order is revoked or altered by the competent judicial body, or if the offender is permanently released, or has escaped from prison or been granted leave by the responsible officers of the detention facility, including information on any measures that may be taken to protect you in the event that the offender has been released or has escaped from prison. Such information must be given to you, subject to authorisation by the public prosecutor, if there is actual or potential danger to your safety, provided that no risk of harm to the offender arises as a result of the disclosure of such information (Article 59 of Law 4478/2017, on the right of victims to receive information about their case (Article 6 of Directive 2012/29/EU)).

Will I be involved in release or parole decisions? For example, can I make a statement or lodge an appeal?

No. However, the Court may require reparation of the damage sustained by the victim of the criminal act (Article 100(3a) of the Criminal Code (Poinikós Kódikas — ‘PK’) as an alternative to or a prerequisite for the suspension of the sentence, subject to probation or supervision by a social assistance officer (epimelitís koinonikís arogís)(Article 100 PK). The offender’s compliance with the Court’s requirements is monitored by the social assistance officer, and in the event of non-compliance, the competent prosecutor may ask the court that ordered the suspension to revoke the order.


The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Last update: 24/06/2019

4 - Compensation


You can claim damages from the offender by making a claim in civil law. You can submit your civil claim as part of the criminal proceedings, during the investigation or during the trial. By submitting your claim you join the criminal proceedings as a civil party (politikós enágon). You can claim financial compensation for damage to your property and/or for moral harm and pain and suffering. You can add to your claim all the expenses you have incurred in relation to the case (lawyers’ fees, bailiffs’ fees, travel expenses, etc.).

If the court finds the offender guilty, it will order him or her to pay you compensation. In practice, this compensation is most often symbolic, and less than the actual damage you have suffered. For the remainder you have to bring a separate action in a civil court.

Alternatively, you can bring your claim directly in the civil court. The civil court will order the offender to pay compensation that corresponds to the actual damage you have suffered.

If you have a claim pending before a civil court, you can re-submit it within the framework of criminal proceedings; the case before the civil court will then be closed.

If you are a victim of violent crime committed intentionally, you are entitled to compensation from the State.. Please consult the factsheet on compensation to crime victims in Greece (available in English, Greek and other languages) of the European Judicial Network (restorative justice).


The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Last update: 24/06/2019

5 - My rights to support and assistance

Please note that the original language version of this page Greek has been amended recently. The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.


The General Secretariat for Gender Equality (Genikí Grammateía Isótitas ton Fýlon), which comes under the Ministry of the Interior, runs advice centres for women who are victims of violence.

It has established an integrated network of 62 structures to help such women.

The network comprises a 24/7 helpline (SOS 15900), 40 advice centres, and 21 hostels for women and their children.

The SOS15900 helpline can also be contacted at the email address Link opens in new windowsos15900@isotita.gr. It operates on a 24/7 basis, 365 days a year, in both Greek and English. Call costs are subject to domestic call charges.

The advice centres offer psychosocial support and legal advice free of charge. The scope of services offered is now expanding to include female employment and women suffering multiple forms of discrimination (support to refugees, single parents, members of the Roma community etc.). Contact information about the advice centres is available on Link opens in new windowhttp://www.womensos.gr/ and on Facebook: WomenSOS.gr

CONTACT INFORMATION:

General Secretariat for Gender Equality website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.isotita.gr/

Research Centre for Gender Equality (Kéntro Erevnón gia Thémata Isótitas — ‘KEThI’)

The Research Centre for Gender Equality offers psychological support and legal assistance to victims of domestic violence and operates a hostel for women who are victims of violence and their children.

The Research Centre for Gender Equality

  • is a body governed by private law which was set up in 1994 and is subject to supervision by the General Secretariat for Gender Equality
  • comprises regional and local services offering psychological support and legal assistance to victims of domestic violence
  • provides psychological support and legal assistance free of charge
  • provides information, advice and support to women facing employment and social exclusion issues
  • in cooperation with Athens Prefecture, has been operating a hostel for women who are victims of violence and their children since 1993.
  • CONTACT INFORMATION:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttps://kethi.gr/

National Centre for Social Solidarity (Ethnikó Kéntro Koinonikís Allilengýis — ‘EKKA’)

The National Centre for Social Solidarity operates a network that offers social support services to individuals, families and social groups experiencing psychosocial difficulties or who are in need of immediate social support.

The National Centre for Social Solidarity

  • is a body governed by private law based in Athens and subject to supervision by the Ministry of Labour, Social Security and Social Solidarity
  • It comprises the following services:
  • The 197 direct social assistance line for all citizens operates on a 24/7 basis. Calls are free of charge.
  • The 1107 national child protection hotline, for questions concerning children, operates on a 24/7 basis.
  • Social support centres in Athens, Piraeus and Thessaloniki
  • Hostels for citizens experiencing serious socio-financial problems in the region of Attica
  • Operates shelters for women at risk and their children in Attica and Thessaloniki
  • Scope of services offered:
  • advice and information on social welfare issues
  • social and psychological support to individuals and families, provision of shelter to women at risk and their children (mainly victims of domestic violence and human trafficking)
  • short-term accommodation for persons going through a crisis or social emergency
  • cooperation and mediation to facilitate access to social solidarity services offered by other organisations.
  • Lastly, the Centre deploys rapid intervention psychosocial support teams, consisting primarily of psychologists and social workers, in situations of natural disasters (earthquake, flood, fire), accidents, shipwrecks involving large numbers of victims, and any crisis involving large numbers of people where the presence of these teams is judged necessary.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.ekka.org.gr/

Medical Rehabilitation Centre for Torture Victims (Iatrikó Kéntro Apokatástasis Thymáton Vasanistiríon)

The Medical Rehabilitation Centre for Torture Victims provides a rehabilitation centre for people who have been tortured and their families; it trains Greek and foreign health professionals in examining and treating torture victims, carries out scientific research, and offers incentives for research into torture and its consequences.

The Medical Rehabilitation Centre for Torture Victims

  • provides a rehabilitation centre for people who have been tortured and their families
  • trains Greek and foreign health professionals in examining and treating torture victims
  • contributes to the broad dissemination of knowledge of the practice of torture and its different forms and the possibility of rehabilitation of torture victims
  • carries out scientific research and offers incentives for research into torture and its consequences
  • maintains and develops an information (documentation) centre
  • contributes to the prevention of torture by pursuing these objectives.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.mrct.org/

Research and Support Centre for Victims of Maltreatment and Social Exclusion (Kéntro Érevnas kai Ypostírixis Thymáton Kakopoíisis kai Koinonikoú Apokleismoú — ‘EKYThKKA’)

The Research and Support Centre for Victims of Maltreatment and Social Exclusion offers medical, psychological, social and legal support to victims of torture and organised violence, maltreatment and social exclusion.

The Research and Support Centre for Victims of Maltreatment and Social Exclusion

  • is a non-profit association governed by civil law
  • offers medical, psychological, social and legal support to victims of torture and organised violence, maltreatment and social exclusion
  • raises awareness of human rights issues, and disseminates knowledge of the existence of manifestations of violence and social exclusion and methods to deal with them both in Greece and abroad
  • offers humanitarian assistance to social groups that have been subjected to organised violence, torture, maltreatment and social exclusion, both in Greece and abroad
  • carries out scientific research on violence and torture, maltreatment and social exclusion
  • contributes to the prevention of torture, maltreatment and social exclusion.


CONTACT INFORMATION:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.cvme.gr/

Greek Council for Refugees (Ellinikó Symvoúlio gia tous Prósfyges)

The Greek Council for Refugees is a non-governmental organisation supporting refugees and asylum seekers in Greece through a wide range of psychosocial and legal services.

The Greek Council for Refugees

  • is a non-governmental organisation founded in 1989 to support refugees and asylum seekers in Greece
  • helps refugees integrate smoothly in Greece through a wide range of psychosocial and legal services
  • is the only Greek non-governmental, non-profit organisation dealing exclusively with people who are seeking asylum in Greece and who are considered to be refugees
  • is registered with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Health and Social Solidarity as a special charitable organisation
  • is one of the six non-governmental organisations that protect human rights in Greece and is a member of the National Commission for Human Rights (Ethnikí Epitropí gia ta Dikaiómata tou Anthrópou)
  • is an implementing partner of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and a member of the European Council on Refugees and Exiles.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.gcr.gr/

Greek Helsinki Monitor (Ellinikó Paratiritírio ton Symfonión tou Elsínki)

The Greek Helsinki Monitor monitors, publishes articles and lobbies on human rights issues in Greece.

The Greek Helsinki Monitor

  • was founded in 1992
  • is the Greek member of the International Helsinki Federation on Human Rights
  • monitors, publishes and lobbies on human rights issues in Greece and, from time to time, in the Balkans
  • has participated in and frequently coordinated the monitoring of Greek and Balkan media for stereotypes and hate speech, and has prepared detailed annual reports, parallel/unofficial reports to UN treaty bodies, and specialised reports on maltreatment and on ethnic, ethno-linguistic, religious and immigrant communities.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttps://greekhelsinki.wordpress.com/

Amnesty International Greek Section (Diethnís Amnistía Ellinikó Tmíma)

Amnesty International addresses governments, intergovernmental organisations, armed political groups, companies and other non-state actors and systematically and impartially investigates individual cases and patterns of human rights abuses.

Amnesty International

  • is a global, independent movement of volunteers fighting for the protection of human rights
  • defends prisoners of conscience, violence and poverty
  • seeks to end violence against women
  • seeks to abolish the death penalty, torture and limitations on freedom imposed in the name of the ‘war on terror’
  • combats discrimination against refugees, immigrants, minorities and defenders of human rights.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.amnesty.org.gr/


The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Last update: 24/06/2019