Rights of victims of crime in criminal proceedings - Sweden

You are considered to be the victim of a crime if you have suffered damage, e.g. you have been injured or your property has been damaged or stolen, as the result of an incident which constitutes a crime under national law. As a victim of crime, the law grants you certain individual rights before, during and after court proceedings. You may also be entitled to various forms of support and compensation for damage caused by the crime.

Criminal proceedings in Sweden start with the investigation of the crime, known as the preliminary investigation. With some exceptions, there is an obligation to start a preliminary investigation if there are grounds to assume a crime has been committed. Preliminary investigations are conducted by the police, but sometimes led by a prosecutor. After the investigation is completed, the prosecutor may decide to continue the proceedings by bringing the case to court or, if the prosecutor does not believe there is sufficient evidence, close the case without bringing it to court. If the case is brought to court there will be a trial. During the trial, the court examines all the evidence collected and decides whether or not to convict the accused of the crime. The court will also state whether there is any possibility to appeal to a higher court.

As the victim of a crime, you play a significant part in proceedings and have a variety of rights. You can participate in legal proceedings without a specific legal status or play a more active part by formally becoming a party to the proceedings. You may claim damages and/or support the prosecution. In certain cases you may bring a private prosecution on your own initiative when the prosecutor has decided not to.

Click on the links below to find the information that you need

Link opens in new window1 - My rights as a victim of crime

Link opens in new window2 - Reporting a crime and my rights during the investigation or trial

Link opens in new window3 - My rights after trial

Link opens in new window4 - Compensation

Link opens in new window5 - My rights to support and assistance


The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Last update: 16/07/2018

1 - My rights as a victim of crime


What information will I get from the authority after the crime occurred (e.g. police, public prosecutor) but before I even report the crime?

The police and the public prosecutor are required to inform you of:

  • your entitlement to damages from the suspect or compensation from the State;
  • the fact that, if you request this, the public prosecutor is usually required to prepare and present your claim for damages in court;
  • the provisions on restraining orders, counsel for the injured party and personal assistance;
  • how to apply for legal aid and advice;
  • the options and conditions for mediation;
  • authorities and organisations offering support and assistance;
  • the contact details needed to obtain information on your own case;
  • the continued proceedings and the role you will play in them;
  • your right to interpreting and translation;
  • your right to reimbursement of costs;
  • the fact that the preliminary investigation has not been initiated or has been dropped;
  • where to address any complaints concerning the handling of your case;
  • whether or not legal proceedings have been initiated;
  • whether a detained or arrested person has absconded.

Note that the above information will be provided following a police report. But you can of course refer to the information on, for example, the website of the Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority (Brottsoffermyndighet) before you file a police report.

I don’t live in the EU country where the crime took place (EU and non-EU citizens). How are my rights protected?

If you are a foreign national and have been the victim of a crime in Sweden, you are entitled to the same information as a Swedish citizen (see above). You are also entitled to interpreting and translation services if you do not speak Swedish.

If you have been the victim of a crime in another country, the authorities in that country are responsible for informing you of your rights. View more information on rights in other EU Member States here.

If I report a crime, what information will I receive?

The police and the public prosecutor are required to inform you of:

  • your entitlement to damages from the suspect or compensation from the State;
  • the fact that, if you request this, the public prosecutor is usually required to prepare and present your claim for damages in court;
  • the provisions on restraining orders, counsel for the injured party and personal assistance;
  • how to apply for legal aid and advice;
  • the options and conditions for mediation;
  • authorities and organisations offering support and assistance;
  • the contact details needed to obtain information on your own case;
  • the continued proceedings and the role you will play in them;
  • your right to interpreting and translation;
  • your right to reimbursement of costs;
  • the fact that the preliminary investigation has not been initiated or has been dropped;
  • where to address any complaints concerning the handling of your case;
  • whether or not legal proceedings have been initiated;
  • whether a detained or arrested person has absconded.

Am I entitled to free interpreting or translation services (when I contact the police or other authorities, or during the investigation and trial)?

You are also entitled to interpreting and translation services if you do not speak Swedish.

How does the authority ensure that I understand and that I am understood (if I am a child; if I have a disability)

You are entitled to an interpreter if you have a disability which means you are deaf, hard of hearing or have a speech impediment.

The Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority (Brottsoffermyndigheten) has produced information material specially designed for children. Visit Link opens in new windowhttps://www.jagvillveta.se/ for details of your rights in the event of a crime.

The police also provide information specially for children: https://polisen.se/Utsatt-for-brott/Olika-typer-av-brott/Barn-och-ungdomar/

Victim support services

Who provides victim support?

As the victim of a crime, you can obtain support from many non-profit associations and organisations. The social services in your municipality are also required by law to ensure that victims of crime and their families receive support and assistance.

Will the police automatically refer me to victim support?

When you report a crime, the police will inform you of authorities and organisations that offer support and assistance. With your consent, the police will also, in some cases, pass your contact details to e.g. a victim support helpline which will then contact you. You can also make contact yourself with an organisation which provides support.

How is my privacy protected?

If you request support from social services, your case will be handled in confidence. People working in their own time for a voluntary organisation supporting victims of crime are sworn to secrecy. You can also remain anonymous when you contact such an organisation.

Do I have to report a crime before I can access victim support?

No, you do not have to.

Personal protection if I’m in danger

What types of protection are available?

There are many types of protection available to victims of crime:

  • Restraining order

A restraining order (kontaktförbud) is designed to avert situations that could be dangerous for the victims. Restraining orders have emerged and been used mainly to protect women against threats and harassment from a former spouse or partner, but they can also be issued to protect children and other vulnerable persons. A restraining order means the person who is threatening and harassing you is forbidden to visit you or contact you in any other way, e.g. by letter, text or telephone or through friends. It can also be extended into an order not to approach your home, workplace or other place that you frequent.

A restraining order can also cover someone who lives with the person being threatened. For such an order to be issued, with the aim of barring the source of the threats from the joint home, there must be a high risk of crime against the partner’s life, health, freedom or safety.

The public prosecutor decides on restraining orders. If the prosecutor does not issue such an order, you can ask for the matter to be brought before the district court (tingsrätt). Anyone who disobeys such an order may be sentenced to a fine or up to one year’s imprisonment.

  • Sheltered housing

Women and their children who have been subjected to domestic violence may need to move out of their home for a while. Sheltered housing is provided by both municipalities and women’s refuges. Contact social services in your municipality or a local women’s centre for more information.

  • Protected personal data

If you need to keep your address secret because of threats or other forms of harassment, you can have a code entered in the population register for a special secrecy check (sekretessmarkering). The code will also be entered in other public registers, such as the register of vehicles and driving licences. The classification is generally reviewed each year.

Another way of protecting personal data is for a threatened person who has moved or intends to do so to remain in the population register at their old address (kvarskrivning). You can remain registered at your old address for up to three years after moving.

Requests for protected personal data in the form of secrecy coding and use of old addresses should be submitted to the local tax office where you are registered. It is important to state that you have protected personal data when you talk to authorities. You must also be very careful when dealing with organisations, companies and others.

  • Change of name

Another way of enhancing protection could be to change your name. You can switch to a parent’s surname by notifying the Swedish Tax Agency (Skatteverket). A change to any other surname requires authorisation from the Swedish Patent and Registration Office (Patent- och registreringsverket).

  • Security pack

For some people, the threat is so serious that it may be necessary to use a ‘security pack’. The pack contains a mobile phone and alarm system and can be borrowed from the local police authority subject to a specific review.

  • Fictitious personal data

Where there is a threat of serious crime against your life, health or freedom, or where other safety measures are not felt to provide sufficient protection, you may be allowed to use fictitious (i.e. invented) personal details. Requests to use fictitious personal data should be made to the police.

  • Witness protection programme

In exceptional cases, when other measures are not working, threatened persons who could influence the outcome of a court case can enter the special witness protection programme run by the police.

Who can offer me protection?

Depending on the type of protection, different organisations may make decisions on protection. See section above.

Will someone assess my case to see if I am at risk of further harm by the offender?

In order to determine your need for special protective measures during the police enquiries and court proceedings, the police should make an individual safety assessment as soon as possible. This will take account of the severity of the crime and your personal circumstances. If you are under 18, you will always be considered to need special protection.

The social services also tend to use special assessment methods to examine the risk of renewed exposure to violence from an offender you are living with.

Will someone assess my case to see if I am at risk of further harm by the criminal justice system (during investigation and trial)?

In order to determine your need for special protective measures during the police enquiries and court proceedings, the police should make an individual safety assessment as soon as possible. This will take account of the severity of the crime and your personal circumstances. If you are under 18, you will always be considered to need special protection.

What protection is available for very vulnerable victims?

The most far-reaching protective measures in the case of serious crime are fictitious personal details and the witness protection programme (see above).

I am a minor – do I have special rights?

The social services are responsible for ensuring that a child who has been the victim of a crime, and its relatives, receive the help and support that they need. The social services should also remember that a child who has witnessed violence or other abuse against a relative is also the victim of a crime, and ensure that the child receives the help and support that it needs.

My family member died because of the crime – what are my rights?

The social services are also responsible for providing support to relatives when a family member is the victim of a crime. There are also non-profit associations dedicated to supporting relatives when a family member has died because of a crime.

My family member was a victim of crime – what are my rights?

The social services are also responsible for providing support to relatives when a family member is the victim of a crime. Many of the protective measures described above may also apply to you if you have a relative who has been the victim of a crime. Many non-profit organisations also offer support to relatives.

Can I access mediation services? What are the conditions? Will I be safe during mediation?

Mediation means that the victim and the perpetrator meet to discuss what has happened with an impartial mediator. When the perpetrator is under 21, the municipality is required to offer mediation.

A condition for mediation is that the crime must be acknowledged. Both parties must also want to participate. Mediation may lead to agreement, e.g. on how the parties should behave in future meetings with each other, which can give the victim some reassurance.

Agreements on financial compensation for damages are also possible, but can lead to problems, particularly where there are several perpetrators, large sums or personal injuries involved. Contact the Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority (Brottsoffermyndigheten) if you have any questions on such agreements. If you enter into an agreement on financial compensation, you may lose the right to claim crime victim compensation.

The appointed mediator (who must be competent, honest and impartial) is responsible for ensuring that the mediation proceeds in a safe manner for you.

Where can I find the law stating my rights?

A list of important acts and regulations can be found on the Link opens in new windowweb site of the Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority (Brottsoffermyndigheten).


The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Last update: 16/07/2018

2 - Reporting a crime and my rights during the investigation or trial


How do I report a crime?

You can report a crime to the police by calling 114 14 (+46 77 114 14 00 from outside Sweden) or by going to a police station. You can also report a crime via the internet in the case of burglary, payment card fraud, theft or loss (but not of your passport or national ID card). If you have a protected identity, you should not report a crime via the internet. In an emergency, or while a crime is happening, call SOS Alarm on 112. Link to e-report

How do I find out what’s happening with the case?

When you have made a police report, your case will be assigned a number and you will also be given the contact details you need to obtain information on your case. Otherwise, you can ask the police what is happening in your case by contacting them by phone, via e-mail to your local police station or by visiting the closest police station to you. If you want to talk to the police officer who is responsible for your case, you can use the national phone number for the police, 114 14. The switchboard will connect you to the officer responsible for your case.

Am I entitled to legal aid (during the investigation or trial)? Under what conditions?

For some types of crime, victims are entitled to their own legal representation, known as ‘counsel for the injured party’ (målsägandebiträde). This applies particularly to sex crimes and domestic violence, but also to other offences where there is a special need. A representative can be appointed as soon as the (preliminary) investigation has been initiated, and the aid is free of charge to you. If you feel that you need a legal representative, you should discuss this as soon as possible with the public prosecutor (åklagare) or the police officer responsible for the preliminary investigation. You can also submit your request directly to the district court (tingsrätt). The district court will determine whether you are entitled to representation and appoint the counsel. You can suggest whom you wish to have. The counsel, who will usually be a lawyer, is there to safeguard your interests and provide support and assistance during the preliminary investigation and the trial. The counsel is bound to secrecy and can help you to plead your case and submit a claim for damages. This task ends after the court proceedings, and help in recovering damages or obtaining other compensation is not part of the role of the ‘counsel for the injured party’.

If a guardian (usually a parent) is suspected of a crime against his or her child, the child may be assigned a special representative. The same is true where the person suspected of the crime is closely related to the guardian. The representative will safeguard the rights of the child during the preliminary investigation and the trial. A lawyer, assistant counsel in a law firm or another person may be appointed as special representative. There are also requirements for knowledge and experience and personal qualities that make this person especially suited to the task.

Legal protection is included in household insurance policies. This means, for example, that the insurance can reimburse your legal costs if your claim for damages is not dealt with in the criminal proceedings. The insurance will generally include a provision to the effect that you must pay a certain portion of the costs (the excess). Refer to your insurance company for more information.

You can obtain legal advice under the Swedish Legal Aid Act (Rättshjälpslagen) in all types of case. The advice might relate, for example, to a claim for damages where the public prosecutor does not help you or to negotiations with the insurance company. You can contact a law firm which provides legal advice under the Legal Aid Act. You can consult a lawyer for up to two hours for a fixed fee. The fee is around SEK 1 600 per hour. Depending on your financial position, the fee may be lower.

If you do not have any legal protection insurance and your case cannot be settled via the legal advice given, you may obtain legal aid subject to an assessment of your needs. The State will then pay part of the cost of your legal representation. You can also get help with the costs of travel, accommodation and presenting evidence, and with other expenses. A lawyer, the court or the National Legal Aid Authority (Rättshjälpsmyndighet) can advise you on how to apply for legal aid.

Can I claim expenses (for taking part in the investigation/trial)? Under what conditions?

If you are summoned by the police or the public prosecutor, you are entitled to reimbursement of your expenses for coming in for questioning. These may be travel and accommodation costs, compensation for lost income or other financial losses. However, compensation for lost income is limited to a specific amount. Contact the police to request this type of reimbursement.

If you are summoned by the police or the public prosecutor, you are entitled to reimbursement of your expenses for coming in for questioning. The president of the court will sometimes ask whether you have any claim for compensation when your questioning is completed. Generally, however, the matter of payment is dealt with in the court's reception area after the trial. You can then request reimbursement and also find out how much you are to get. Payment will be made directly in the reception area. High costs may be subject to deferral; contact the court for more information.

Can I appeal if my case is closed before going to court?

If your case has been closed and you are dissatisfied with the decision, you can ask for the case to be examined by the public prosecutor. Contact the police, who will pass the matter on to the prosecutor at your request. If you are not happy with a decision taken by the public prosecutor, you can apply to the nearest more senior prosecutor for a retrial (överprövning).

Can I be involved in the trial?

Yes, you will usually need to be involved in the trial, as your evidence is important for the court to be able to decide on the case.

What is my official role in the justice system? For example, am I or can I choose to be a: victim, witness, civil party or private prosecutor?

Under Swedish law, you are defined as an injured party (målsägande) during the preliminary investigation and the trial. You cannot be a party to the case until the public prosecutor has initiated proceedings. You can be a party to the case:

  • when a prosecutor has initiated proceedings;
  • if you have a claim for damages, and/or
  • if you assist in the prosecution.

You can assist in the prosecution at any time during the trial; you will then have almost the same procedural standing as the prosecutor and will be able to present your own evidence to the court, for example. But you do not need to prove anything concerning the crime.

You can bring individual charges on your own initiative or raise a specific charge if the prosecutor has dropped or withdrawn a general charge. Then you need to prove to the court that the crime took place.

What are my rights and obligations in this role?

If you are not a party to the case, you will be notified of the date and time of the trial. However, you will only be notified if you have requested this during the preliminary investigation. If you are a party to the case, you have the right to be present throughout the trial even if the proceedings are not public.

You may be summoned to appear in court if the prosecutor has requested that you be questioned or you have filed a claim for damages. You will receive a summons with the date and time when you are to appear and details of acceptable reasons not to appear in court. If you are ill or have some other acceptable reason not to appear, you must inform the court as soon as possible before the proceedings. The court will then tell you whether or not your presence is required. If you fail to appear without a valid reason, you risk a fine.

During the trial, you have the right to claim damages. You have this right only if you are an injured party. You will also be questioned by the prosecutor and the accused (or his/her lawyer). You will not be questioned under oath. If you are a party to the case, you or your counsel may question the accused, witnesses and experts. At the end of the trail, you will also have the opportunity to say something in conclusion.

If you are summoned by the police or the public prosecutor, you are entitled to reimbursement of your expenses for coming in for questioning. The types of costs that may be reimbursed are travel and accommodation and loss of income (up to SEK 700 per day).

Can I make a statement during the trial or give evidence? Under what conditions?

Yes, the prosecutor will probably want you to be questioned during the trial. However, an injured party cannot appear as a witness. That means that you will not speak under oath. If you are a party to the case, you have the right to give evidence during the trial.

What information will I receive during the trial?

If you are a party to the case, you are entitled to be informed in various ways of the legal proceedings and of what has happened in your case. In Swedish, this is called ‘partsinsyn’. If you are an injured party but not a party to the case, you do not have the same right to be informed of the process.

During the preliminary investigation by the police, you will be asked whether you wish to be informed of the judgment in the case. If you were a party during the trial, the court will send the judgment to you. If you were not a party, the judgment will be sent to you if you have asked to see it.

Will I be able to access court files?

If you are a party to the case, you are entitled to be informed in various ways of the legal proceedings and of what is happening in your case. In Swedish, this is called ‘partsinsyn’ and is intended to meet a party’s need for information to pursue his/her case in an action or trial. This could mean, for example, that you could have access to documents or other materials in a case on request or at the instigation of the court. The court also has a ‘duty of communication’, which means that it must ensure, on its own initiative, that a party is given access to documents or other investigation material submitted in the case by someone other than the party him/herself. The party may also comment on the material to the court.

If you are an injured party but not a party to the case, you do not have the same right to be informed of the process.


The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Last update: 16/07/2018

3 - My rights after trial


Can I appeal against the ruling?

A party who is not satisfied with the judgment of the district court (tingsrätt) can bring it before the Court of Appeal (hovrätt). Details of how to do this are given in the judgment. In some cases, leave to appeal may be required for the Court of Appeal to take up the case. If the judgment is appealed, there will usually be a fresh trial in the Court of Appeal. In most cases, injured parties and witnesses do not need to be present during this trial. The evidence from the district court is played back instead. In a few cases, however, the Court of Appeal may reach a decision on the case without conducting any main hearing.

The judgment of the Court of Appeal can generally be appealed to the Supreme Court (Högsta domstolen). However, the Supreme Court will only hear a case if there is a question of principle (precedent) involved or where there are obvious grounds for a retrial, such as a gross error by the district court or the Court of Appeal. In practice, therefore, the Court of Appeal is usually the court of last instance.

What are my rights after sentencing?

If you are a party to the case, you have the right to receive a written copy of the judgment as soon as possible. If you are not a party to the case, you must contact the court to obtain details of the content of the judgment.

You are generally entitled to have documents translated. If necessary, the court may translate documents submitted to or sent out by the court. You may however need to contact the court and ask for this service. The translation will be free of charge to you.

You cannot be represented by a ‘counsel for the injured party’ (målsägandebiträde) at the expense of the public at this stage of the judicial process. The counsel’s duty to assist you ends once the proceedings are over. You may however choose to take on a legal representative at your own expense. If you are entitled to legal aid, the State may cover part of your costs for legal representation.

If you need a support person at this stage, you can contact one of the non-profit organisations in this area, such as a victim support line or a women’s helpline – Brottsofferjouren Sverige, Riksorganisationen för kvinnojourer och tjejjourer i Sverige (ROKS), Unizon, etc.

Am I entitled to support or protection after the trial? For how long?

Yes, you may be entitled to support or protection after the trial. There is no particular limit to the time you can receive support or protection from non-profit organisations or the social services. There are some time limits applicable to protected personal data. You can read more about this under ‘Personal protection if I’m in danger’ (My rights as the victim of a crime).

What information will I be given if the offender is sentenced?

The judgment will specify the sentence handed down and how long the convicted person is to remain in prison, for example. In the case of a crime against the person (crimes against a person’s life, health, freedom or safety) you as the injured party will be asked by the Swedish Prison and Probation Service whether you wish to be informed:

  • of the institution in which the convicted person has been placed in Sweden,
  • if the convicted person is moved to another institution or transferred to another country,
  • if the convicted person is anywhere outside the institution,
  • if the convicted person or the Swedish Prison and Probation Service applies for a life sentence to be commuted,
  • if the convicted person is released,
  • if the convicted person escapes or is sprung from jail, or
  • if the convicted person absconds after leave or other time spent outside the institution.

The Swedish Prison and Probation Service does not need to provide any notification if this could endanger the detainee’s life or health.

Will I be told if the offender is released (including early or conditional release) or escapes from prison?

In the case of a crime against the person (crimes against a person’s life, health, freedom or safety) you as the injured party will be asked by the Swedish Prison and Probation Service whether you wish to be informed:

  • if the convicted person is released,
  • if the convicted person escapes or is sprung from jail, or
  • if the convicted person absconds after leave or other time spent outside the institution.

Will I be involved in release or parole decisions? For example, can I make a statement or lodge an appeal?

No, you have no such right.


The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Last update: 16/07/2018

4 - Compensation


What is the process for claiming damages from the offender? (e.g. court case, civil claim, adhesion procedure)

You can claim damages for more or less any injury suffered in connection with the crime. Claims for damages are usually heard at the same time as the court decides whether the accused is guilty of the crime.

The victim or injured party has to claim damages from the person who committed the crime or caused the injury. To facilitate this, the prosecutor (åklagare) will prepare and present your claim for damages during the trial, if you have requested this. The only exceptions are claims for damages that require extensive investigation or claims that may be considered obviously unjustified, i.e. either unconnected with the crime or much larger than normal in similar situations.

If you seek compensation for injuries suffered as a result of a crime, you should say so when you are questioned by the police. You should also say whether you want the prosecutor to help you with the claim.

The court ordered the offender to pay me damages/compensation. How do I make sure the offender pays?

The fact that the court has ordered the accused to pay damages does not mean that you will automatically receive the money. The offender will often be unable to pay or will not do so voluntarily. The Enforcement Authority (Kronofogden) will help you to get the damages paid.

The court will send a copy of the judgment to the Enforcement Authority, which will then contact you by letter to ask whether you want help in obtaining the damages. If you want this, you have to fill in the form sent to you and return it to the Enforcement Authority, which will then examine the offender’s financial situation. If it turns out that he or she is able to pay, the Enforcement Authority will ensure that you receive damages.

Help from the Enforcement Authority is free of charge except in very specific cases. If you are not contacted by the Enforcement Authority, you should contact them yourself.

If the offender does not pay, can the state pay me an advance?  Under what conditions?

No, this is not possible.

Am I entitled to compensation from the state?

If a convicted offender cannot pay damages and there is no insurance to cover the whole claim, you may be entitled to compensation from the State. This is called is called crime victim compensation (brottsskadeersättning) and is handled by the Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority (Brottsoffermyndigheten).

To enable crime victim compensation to be paid when the perpetrator is unknown, there must be enquiries, such as a preliminary investigation, to show that you have been the victim of a crime rather than have suffered an accident. The crime must always be reported to the police. If the suspect has been identified, there must normally be a conviction or a sentence passed.

Crime victim compensation covers crimes committed in Sweden, and you may be entitled to compensation whether you live in Sweden or are in Sweden on a temporary basis, e.g. as a tourist or student. If you are actually resident in Sweden, you may be entitled to compensation even when the crime took place abroad.

Like the excess on an insurance policy, a similar amount will be deducted from the crime victim compensation.

Am I entitled to compensation if the offender is not convicted?

To enable crime victim compensation to be paid when the perpetrator is unknown, there must be enquiries, such as a preliminary investigation, to show that you have been the victim of a crime rather than have suffered an accident. The crime must always be reported to the police. If the suspect has been identified, there must normally be a conviction or a sentence passed.

Am I entitled to an emergency payment while I wait for the decision on my compensation claim?

No, that is not possible.


The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Last update: 16/07/2018

5 - My rights to support and assistance


I am a victim of crime; who do I contact for support and assistance?

Barnens Rätt i Samhället (BRIS – Children’s Rights in Society)

BRIS is a children’s rights organisation with no political or religious affiliation. Vulnerable children and young people up to 18 years of age can e-mail, chat or call an advisor at BRIS anonymously and free of charge. BRIS also takes calls from adults who need someone to talk to about questions and concerns relating to children and young people.

Contact details:

116 111, helpline for children and young people

077 150 50 50, helpline for adults

Link opens in new windowinfo@bris.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.bris.se/

Brottsofferjouren Sverige (Victim Support Sweden)

Victim Support Sweden is a non-profit organisation which works for the right of all victims of crime to receive support. It consists of local victim support centres around the country, a secretariat and a toll-free national helpline. The organisation assists victims of crime, witnesses and relatives by listening and providing support and good advice. If necessary, the victim can obtain support in dealings with other bodies that can provide, for example, psychological help, sheltered housing or financial assistance. Victims can also obtain guidance on the criminal proceedings. Victim Support Sweden also organises witness support from volunteers who provide information and support in connection with a trial.

Contact details:

0200 21 20 19

08 644 88 00

Link opens in new windowinfo@brottsofferjouren.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.brottsofferjouren.se/

Föreningen anhöriga till sexuellt utnyttjade barn (ATSUB – Association for Relatives of Sexually Abused Children)

ATSUB holds individual consultations with relatives of sexually abused children, and offers help and support in dealings with authorities. The Association also arranges support groups and provides assistance in court.

Contact details:

08 644 21 12

Link opens in new windowinfo@atsub.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://atsub.se/

Riksförbundet för homosexuellas, bisexuellas och transpersoners rättigheter (RFSL – Swedish Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights), victim support line

RFSL is a non-profit organisation which exists to ensure that LGBT people have the same rights, opportunities and obligations as everyone else in society. RFSL runs a victim support line for LGBT people who have been subjected to abuse, threats and violence. The service is also aimed at relatives and friends and people who meet vulnerable LGBT people in their work. The organisation offers crisis meetings, information on rights, help in dealings with authorities, support in the judicial process and sheltered housing.

Contact details:

020 34 13 16

Link opens in new windowboj@rfsl.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.rfsl.se/verksamhet/brottsofferjour/

Riksorganisationen för kvinnojourer och tjejjourer i Sverige (ROKS – National Organisation for Women’s Shelters and Young Women's Shelters in Sweden)

ROKS coordinates local member centres and provides help and sheltered housing for abused women, girls and children. The organisation also does opinion-forming work to publicise the experience of the member centres and so reduce violence by men against women.

Contact details:

08 442 99 30

Link opens in new windowinfo@roks.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.roks.se/

Riksföreningen stödcentrum mot incest och andra sexuella övergrepp i barndomen (RISE – National support centre for victims of incest and other forms of sexual abuse in childhood)

RISE is a non-profit organisation which offers support to adults who were subjected to sexual abuse in childhood. The association has a helpline which women, and men, children, relatives and professionals can call. RISE also offers various activities to its members, including discussions in support groups.

Contact details:

08 696 00 95

Link opens in new windowstod@rise-sverige.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.roks.se/

Terrafem

Terrafem is a non-profit organisation. It runs Sweden’s only nationwide helpline for women of immigrant background who have been victims of violence. Terrafem also runs a legal helpline and provides protection for abused women and their children in sheltered housing.

Contact details:

020 52 10 10

08 643 05 10

Link opens in new windowinfo@terrafem.org

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.terrafem.org/

Unizon

Unizon represents women’s shelters, young women’s empowerment centres and other support services working for a gender-equal society free from violence. The work of the member organisations mainly involves supporting and protecting abused women and their children. The organisations also do preventive and supporting work with children and young people, influence opinion and spread knowledge.

Contact details:

08 642 64 01

Link opens in new windowinfo@unizon.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://unizon.se/

Public authorities and other bodies

Brottsoffermyndigheten (Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority)

The overall purpose of the Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority is to work to promote the rights of victims of crime and attend to their needs and interests. The Authority has nationwide responsibility for four areas of activity: handling crime victim compensation cases, administering the Crime Victim Fund (Brottsofferfonden), acting as a centre of expertise, and reclaiming crime victim compensation that has been paid.

Contact details:

090 70 82 00

Link opens in new windowregistrator@brottsoffermyndigheten.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.brottsoffermyndigheten.se/

Domstolsverket (National Courts Administration)

The National Courts Administration is a State authority which reports to the Government and acts as a service organisation for the Swedish courts. The National Courts Administration is responsible for overall coordination and general issues affecting the Swedish courts. This also involves providing services to the courts, the national rent and tenancies tribunals and the National Legal Aid Authority (Rättshjälpsmyndigheten).

Contact details:

036 15 53 00

Link opens in new windowdomstolsverket@dom.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.domstol.se/

Kronofogden (Swedish Enforcement Authority)

The Swedish Enforcement Authority is a State authority. Among other things, it works to establish debts through payment orders and to help anyone who has not been paid to recover a debt.

Contact details:

0771 73 73 00

Link opens in new windowkronofogdemyndigheten@kronofogden.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.kronofogden.se/

Nationellt centrum för kvinnofrid (NCK – National Centre for Knowledge of Violence by Men Against Women)

The National Centre for Knowledge of Violence by Men Against Women (NCK) at Uppsala University works on behalf of the Government to raise awareness at the national level of violence by men against women, honour-related violence and oppression and violence in same-sex relationships. NCK is responsible for the ‘Kvinnofridslinjen’, Sweden’s national helpline for victims of violence, and for a specialised outpatient unit for abused women at Uppsala University Hospital.

Contact details:

020 50 50 50

018 611 27 93

Link opens in new windowinfo@nck.uu.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.nck.uu.se/

Polismyndigheten (Swedish Police)

The Police Authority investigates crimes and works to prevent new crimes. The Police Authority also handles cases involving fictitious personal data.

Contact details:

114 14

112 (in emergency)

Link opens in new windowregistrator.kansli@polisen.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://polisen.se/

Rättshjälpsmyndigheten (National Legal Aid Authority)

The National Legal Aid Authority is a nationwide authority which provides legal aid under the Swedish Legal Aid Act. The National Legal Aid Authority is also the recovery authority when a court has decided to demand repayment of costs, including reimbursement of defence costs in criminal cases.

Contact details:

060 13 46 00

Link opens in new windowrattshjalpsmyndigheten@dom.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.rattshjalp.se/

Skatteverket (Swedish Tax Agency)

The Swedish Tax Agency is the administrative authority for taxation, property assessment, the population register and registration of deeds. The Swedish Tax Agency also handles requests for the protection of personal data (secrecy coding and use of old addresses).

Contact details:

0771 567 567

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.skatteverket.se/privat.4.76a43be412206334b89800052864.html

Sveriges Kommuner och Landsting (SKL – Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions)

SKL is a membership organisation for all municipal, county and regional councils.

Contact details:

08 452 70 00

Link opens in new windowinfo@skl.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://skl.se/

Åklagarmyndigheten (Swedish Prosecution Authority)

The Prosecution Authority works with the police to investigate crimes. If an enquiry leads to charges, the case will be tried in court. The public prosecutor’s job is then to prove that the accused committed the crime.

Contact details:

010 562 50 00

Link opens in new windowregistrator@aklagare.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.aklagare.se/

Victim support hotlines

Barnens Rätt i Samhället (BRIS – Children’s Rights in Society)

BRIS is a children’s rights organisation with no political or religious affiliation. Vulnerable children and young people up to 18 years of age can e-mail, chat or call an advisor at BRIS anonymously and free of charge. BRIS also takes calls from adults who need someone to talk to about questions and concerns relating to children and young people.

Contact details:

116 111, helpline for children and young people

077 150 50 50, helpline for adults

Brottsofferjouren Sverige (Victim Support Sweden)

Victim Support Sweden is a non-profit organisation which works for the right of all victims of crime to receive support. It consists of local victim support centres around the country, a secretariat and a toll-free national helpline. The organisation assists victims of crime, witnesses and relatives by listening and providing support and good advice. If necessary, the victim can obtain support in dealings with other bodies that can provide, for example, psychological help, sheltered housing or financial assistance. Victims can also obtain guidance on the criminal proceedings. Victim Support Sweden also organises witness support from volunteers who provide information and support in connection with a trial.

Victim Support Sweden runs a national helpline which can provide support to all victims of crime and also refer them to a local victim support centre. The national helpline can provide support in 21 different languages.

Contact details:

0200 21 20 19

Brottsoffermyndigheten (Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority)

The overall purpose of the Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority is to work to promote the rights of victims of crime and attend to their needs and interests. The Authority has nationwide responsibility for four areas of activity: handling crime victim compensation cases, administering the Crime Victim Fund (Brottsofferfonden), acting as a centre of expertise, and reclaiming crime victim compensation that has been paid.

The Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority runs a helpline which can answer questions on financial compensation following a crime and also on, for example, the right to ‘counsel for the injured party’, special representation for children, restraining orders and judicial proceedings.

Contact details:

090 70 82 00

Nationellt centrum för kvinnofrid (NCK – National Centre for Knowledge of Violence by Men Against Women)

The National Centre for Knowledge of Violence by Men Against Women (NCK) at Uppsala University works on behalf of the Government to raise awareness at the national level of violence by men against women, honour-related violence and oppression and violence in same-sex relationships. NCK is responsible for the ‘Kvinnofridslinjen’, Sweden’s national helpline for victims of violence, and for a specialised outpatient unit for abused women at Uppsala University Hospital.

Contact details:

020 50 50 50

Terrafem

Terrafem is a non-profit organisation. It runs Sweden’s only nationwide helpline for women of immigrant background who have been victims of violence. Terrafem also runs a legal helpline and provides protection for abused women and their children in sheltered housing.

Contact details:

020 52 10 10

Riksförbundet för homosexuellas, bisexuellas och transpersoners rättigheter (RFSL – Swedish Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights), victim support line

RFSL is a non-profit organisation which exists to ensure that LGBT people have the same rights, opportunities and obligations as everyone else in society. RFSL runs a victim support line for LGBT people who have been subjected to abuse, threats and violence. The service is also aimed at relatives and friends and people who meet vulnerable LGBT people in their work. The organisation offers crisis meetings, information on rights, help in dealings with authorities, support in the judicial process and sheltered housing.

Contact details:

020 34 13 16

Is victim support free?

Yes, support to victims provided by a non-profit organisation is free. The same is true of the support services managed by public authorities.

What types of support can I receive from state services or authorities?

Brottsoffermyndigheten (Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority)

The overall purpose of the Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority is to work to promote the rights of victims of crime and attend to their needs and interests. The Authority has nationwide responsibility for four areas of activity: handling crime victim compensation cases, administering the Crime Victim Fund (Brottsofferfonden), acting as a centre of expertise, and reclaiming crime victim compensation that has been paid.

Contact details:

090 70 82 00

Link opens in new windowregistrator@brottsoffermyndigheten.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.brottsoffermyndigheten.se/

Domstolsverket (National Courts Administration)

The National Courts Administration is a State authority which reports to the Government and acts as a service organisation for the Swedish courts. The National Courts Administration is responsible for overall coordination and general issues affecting the Swedish courts. This also involves providing services to the courts, the national rent and tenancies tribunals and the National Legal Aid Authority (Rättshjälpsmyndigheten).

Contact details:

036 15 53 00

Link opens in new windowdomstolsverket@dom.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.domstol.se/

Kronofogden (Swedish Enforcement Authority)

The Swedish Enforcement Authority is a State authority. Among other things, it works to establish debts through payment orders and to help anyone who has not been paid to recover a debt.

Contact details:

0771 73 73 00

Link opens in new windowkronofogdemyndigheten@kronofogden.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.kronofogden.se/

Nationellt centrum för kvinnofrid (NCK – National Centre for Knowledge of Violence by Men Against Women)

The National Centre for Knowledge of Violence by Men Against Women (NCK) at Uppsala University works on behalf of the Government to raise awareness at the national level of violence by men against women, honour-related violence and oppression and violence in same-sex relationships. NCK is responsible for the ‘Kvinnofridslinjen’, Sweden’s national helpline for victims of violence, and for a specialised outpatient unit for abused women at Uppsala University Hospital.

Contact details:

020 50 50 50

018 611 27 93

Link opens in new windowinfo@nck.uu.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.nck.uu.se/

Polismyndigheten (Swedish Police)

The Police Authority investigates crimes and works to prevent new crimes. The Police Authority also handles cases involving fictitious personal data.

Contact details:

114 14

112 (in emergency)

Link opens in new windowregistrator.kansli@polisen.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://polisen.se/

Rättshjälpsmyndigheten (National Legal Aid Authority)

The National Legal Aid Authority is a nationwide authority which provides legal aid under the Swedish Legal Aid Act. The National Legal Aid Authority is also the recovery authority when a court has decided to demand repayment of costs, including reimbursement of defence costs in criminal cases.

Contact details:

060 13 46 00

Link opens in new windowrattshjalpsmyndigheten@dom.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.rattshjalp.se/

Skatteverket (Swedish Tax Agency)

The Swedish Tax Agency is the administrative authority for taxation, property assessment, the population register and registration of deeds. The Swedish Tax Agency also handles requests for the protection of personal data (secrecy coding and use of old addresses).

Contact details:

0771 567 567

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.skatteverket.se/

Sveriges Kommuner och Landsting (SKL – Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions)

SKL is a membership organisation for all municipal, county and regional councils.

Contact details:

08 452 70 00

Link opens in new windowinfo@skl.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://skl.se/

Åklagarmyndigheten (Swedish Prosecution Authority)

The Prosecution Authority works with the police to investigate crimes. If an enquiry leads to charges, the case will be tried in court. The public prosecutor’s job is then to prove that the accused committed the crime.

Contact details:

010 562 50 00

Link opens in new windowregistrator@aklagare.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.aklagare.se/

What types of support can I receive from non-governmental organisations?

Barnens Rätt i Samhället (BRIS – Children’s Rights in Society)

BRIS is a children’s rights organisation with no political or religious affiliation. Vulnerable children and young people up to 18 years of age can e-mail, chat or call an advisor at BRIS anonymously and free of charge. BRIS also takes calls from adults who need someone to talk to about questions and concerns relating to children and young people.

Contact details:

116 111, helpline for children and young people

077 150 50 50, helpline for adults

Link opens in new windowinfo@bris.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.bris.se/

Brottsofferjouren Sverige (Victim Support Sweden)

Victim Support Sweden is a non-profit organisation which works for the right of all victims of crime to receive support. It consists of local victim support centres around the country, a secretariat and a toll-free national helpline. The organisation assists victims of crime, witnesses and relatives by listening and providing support and good advice. If necessary, the victim can obtain support in dealings with other bodies that can provide, for example, psychological help, sheltered housing or financial assistance. Victims can also obtain guidance on the criminal proceedings. Victim Support Sweden also organises witness support from volunteers who provide information and support in connection with a trial.

Contact details:

0200 21 20 19

08 644 88 00

Link opens in new windowinfo@brottsofferjouren.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.brottsofferjouren.se/

Föreningen anhöriga till sexuellt utnyttjade barn (ATSUB – Association for Relatives of Sexually Abused Children)

ATSUB holds individual consultations with relatives of sexually abused children, and offers help and support in dealings with authorities. The Association also arranges support groups and provides assistance in court.

Contact details:

08 644 21 12

Link opens in new windowinfo@atsub.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://atsub.se/

Riksförbundet för homosexuellas, bisexuellas och transpersoners rättigheter (RFSL – Swedish Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights), victim support line

RFSL is a non-profit organisation which exists to ensure that LGBT people have the same rights, opportunities and obligations as everyone else in society. RFSL runs a victim support line for LGBT people who have been subjected to abuse, threats and violence. The service is also aimed at relatives and friends and people who meet vulnerable LGBT people in their work. The organisation offers crisis meetings, information on rights, help in dealings with authorities, support in the judicial process and sheltered housing.

Contact details:

020 34 13 16

Link opens in new windowboj@rfsl.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.rfsl.se/verksamhet/brottsofferjour/

Riksorganisationen för kvinnojourer och tjejjourer i Sverige (ROKS – National Organisation for Women’s Shelters and Young Women's Shelters in Sweden)

ROKS coordinates local member centres and provides help and sheltered housing for abused women, girls and children. The organisation also does opinion-forming work to publicise the experience of the member centres and so reduce violence by men against women.

Contact details:

08 442 99 30

Link opens in new windowinfo@roks.se

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.roks.se/

Riksföreningen stödcentrum mot incest och andra sexuella övergrepp i barndomen (RISE – National support centre for victims of incest and other forms of sexual abuse in childhood)

RISE is a non-profit organisation which offers support to adults who were subjected to sexual abuse in childhood. The association has a helpline which women, and men, children, relatives and professionals can call. RISE also offers various activities to its members, including discussions in support groups.

Contact details:

08 696 00 95

Link opens in new windowstod@rise-sverige.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://rise-sverige.se/

Terrafem

Terrafem is a non-profit organisation. It runs Sweden’s only nationwide helpline for women of immigrant background who have been victims of violence. Terrafem also runs a legal helpline and provides protection for abused women and their children in sheltered housing.

Contact details:

020 52 10 10

08 643 05 10

Link opens in new windowinfo@terrafem.org

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.terrafem.org/

Unizon

Unizon represents women’s shelters, young women’s empowerment centres and other support services working for a gender-equal society free from violence. The work of the member organisations mainly involves supporting and protecting abused women and their children. The organisations also do preventive and supporting work with children and young people, influence opinion and spread knowledge.

Contact details:

08 642 64 01

Link opens in new windowinfo@unizon.se

Link opens in new windowhttp://unizon.se/


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Last update: 16/07/2018